Home
Primary (age 6-11)
Training & Consultancy
Contact & About
  Equipment suppliers
  Data files to download
  Photos of old equipment
 

Choose an experiment:

Combustion
Titration
Exothermic
Rate of reaction 1
Rate of reaction 2
Rate of reaction 3
Rates - Colorimetry
Amylase
Aquarium
Breathing
Pulse
Fermentation
Lipase & fat
Food energy
Plant growth
Germination
Photosynthesis
Respiration
Insulation
Insulation - cups
Conducting
Conduction - window
Half-life
Pressure / temp
Pendulum
Battery types
Battery life
Capacitor
Current - Volt
Coil field
Thermistor

 
Rate of reaction 2 - The effect of surface area 
Hydrochloric acid and marble (CaCO3) react to form carbon dioxide gas. The gas can be captured and measured using a gas syringe. A position sensor can be attached to the syringe to record the rate of the reaction. This experiment shows the effect of surface area on the reaction. The effect of acid concentration could also be explored. 

What you need

Clamps, bosses and stands, marble pieces (large, medium and small sizes), 1M hydrochloric acid HCl, flask, bung, delivery tube, a good gas syringe, interface, position sensor. alt

 



 

 

 

Setting up

Set up the flask, position sensor, the gas syringe and 1g of large marble pieces as shown.
Connect the sensor to the interface. When you start your sensing software it should recognise the sensor - otherwise you will have to do this yourself.
You may want to calibrate the sensor so that the computer displays the volume of the syringe directly. If so, find the calibration feature in the software and enter the volumes for the upper and lower limits of the position sensor movement - like a two-point calibration.
Set up the software to record for 90 seconds. Start recording and immediately add 5cm3 acid to the marble in the flask.
Repeat using different sized marble pieces.

Questions

How does the graph show the progress of the reaction?
When was the reaction at its fastest? How can you tell?
Which part of each graph best shows how fast the reaction was working?
Calculate the average gradient of each of your graphs to compare them.

You may overlay (merge together) the results of several experiments.

 

Activities in this section adapted from The IT in Science book of Data logging and Control. © IT in Science and may be reproduced as needed for use within your school.

 

About our Work  l  Data logging  l  Hardware  l  Data handling  l  Software  l  Consumer