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Choose an experiment:

Combustion
Titration
Exothermic
Rate of reaction 1
Rate of reaction 2
Rate of reaction 3
Rates - Colorimetry
Amylase
Aquarium
Breathing
Pulse
Fermentation
Lipase & fat
Food energy
Plant growth
Germination
Photosynthesis
Respiration
Insulation
Insulation - cups
Conducting
Conduction - window
Half-life
Pressure / temp
Pendulum
Battery types
Battery life
Capacitor
Current - Volt
Coil field
Thermistor

 
Pulse - How your pulse changes 
The speed of your pulse changes as you go about your day. It changes as you sit, walk or exercise.
It is quite easy to record your pulse using the computer. You connect yourself to a pulse sensor and the sensor sends readings to the computer. What is more, the computer can measure your pulse continuously, and show you changes over time. You might start by measuring your pulse over several minutes. You can then choose an idea to investigate, for example:
How does your pulse change during and after exercise?
How do your results compare with other people's results?
These instructions show you how to set up the sensor. 

What you need

Pulse sensor with probe.

Setting up

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Connect the pulse sensor to a socket on the interface.
Connect the pulse probe to your body.
Start your sensing software.
Some systems will automatically recognise the sensor you attach, in others you have to set up the software to do this.
Get your software to record for 10 minutes. The sensor may need some seconds before it gives a steady reading.

Questions

How does the graph show your pulse rate increasing?
What are the units for measuring the pulse?
What part of the graph is the best place to measure your pulse rate at rest?
Describe what happened to your pulse while you were measuring.
Describe how your pulse compares with other peoples'.
How can we use this to measure an individual's fitness?

Activities in this section adapted from The IT in Science book of Data logging and Control. © IT in Science and may be reproduced as needed for use within your school.

 

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